The Dystopia of Minority Report Needs Proprietary Software

Monday 13 February 2017 by Bradley M. Kuhn

I encourage all of you to either listen to or read the transcript of Terry Gross' Fresh Air interview with Joseph Turow about his discussion of his book “The Aisles Have Eyes: How Retailers Track Your Shopping, Strip Your Privacy, And Define Your Power”.

Now, most of you who read my blog know the difference between proprietary and Free Software, and the difference between a network service and software that runs on your own device. I want all of you have a good understanding of that to do a simple thought experiment:

How many of the horrible things that Turow talks about can happen if there is no proprietary software on your IoT or mobile devices?

AFAICT, other than the facial recognition in the store itself that he talked about in Russia, everything he talks about would be mitigated or eliminated completely as a thread if users could modify the software on their devices.

Yes, universal software freedom will not solve all the worlds' problems. But it does solve a lot of them, at least with regard to the bad things the powerful want to do to us via technology.

(BTW, the blog title is a reference to Philip K. Dick's Minority Report, which includes a scene about systems reading people's eyes to target-market to them. It's not the main theme of that particular book, though… Dick was always going off on tangents in his books.)

Posted on Monday 13 February 2017 at 19:30 by Bradley M. Kuhn.

Submit comments on this post to <bkuhn@ebb.org>.



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#include <std/disclaimer.h>
use Standard::Disclaimer;
from standard import disclaimer
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Both previously and presently, I have been employed by and/or done work for various organizations that also have views on Free, Libre, and Open Source Software. As should be blatantly obvious, this is my website, not theirs, so please do not assume views and opinions here belong to any such organization. Since I do co-own ebb.org with my wife, it may not be so obvious that these aren't her views and opinions, either.

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Bradley M. Kuhn <bkuhn@ebb.org>